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Ttouslee

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Ttouslee

Any suggestions on jumping? Bella does pretty good about not jumping on my husband or I when we get home from work, but is terrible when our small grandchildren come in. She loves children SO much and gets so excited, she knocks over our youngest granddaughter often. We are consistent with her and have taught the grandkids to say "down" but no luck so far, anyone have ideas?

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PipsMom

I do hope someone here has some ideas for you till she calms down around your granddaughter ....no fun for the little girl to get bowled over at grandma's.

I'll keep bumping the thread so it says up top in view and hopefully good advice will be coming your way soon

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ParadiseTzu

Wish I could help but this has been a hard bad habit for me to break them of. We dont have visitors often but when we do, the dogs climb and scratch at their legs. Since they dont do us that way, I have never been able to think of something to practice on to teach them it is a no-no.

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Pawz4me

How old are your grandkids?

Does Bella really, really know "down"? I mean know it as in she'll do it for you almost instantly in all sorts of different settings and situations, including lots of distractions? If you haven't "proofed" her on it like that then I wouldn't be asking little kids to use it. It very well may inadvertently teach her to ignore the command and set her training backwards. One of the golden rules of dog training is that you never, ever ask for a behavior if you're not sure the dog will comply or if you can't enforce it.

Have you tried having them kneel down to greet her?

Sometimes the best choice is to crate the dog when you're expecting company to arrive, let all the humans get over their greetings and give the dog a few minutes to adjust to the newcomers before allowing the dog out to interact.

The above are a lot of "correct" and "supposed to" responses. But IME the fact of the matter is some dogs just get so darn excited it's hard to know what to do. We were gone for a few hours last night and when we got home Yogi (five years old and supposedly long past the puppy stage) got so excited he didn't know what to do with himself for about fifteen minutes. And it was just us, his regular people that he lives with all the time and who come and go all the time.

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Crinkly

The puppy classes we went to with C&T had an absolutely brilliant solution to puppies jumping up.  Works on any size dog, and works really quickly.

- let them do it

- then take a gentle but firm grip on their forelegs (like you are holding their hands)

- and hold on

- dont tell them off, don't talk to them, just stand there quietly.  No pulling or tugging or sqeezing.

- the dog will soon realise that it isn't getting the fuss and attention it wants.  And that their paws are trapped!  Eeek!  And they try and pull away.

- hold on

- they will try to pull away harder.  And they will trample on their back legs. Maybe lick your hands (Tara did the licked, and tried to use her teeth a bit - that was when she DID get told off!).

- let go before they get distressed, but make sure they have had a bit of time when they feel 'trapped' and are likely to remember it.

- repeat the next time they jump up.

it took just 3 repetitions of this before Tara learned to dance around on her back legs in front of us, never touching.  Bless her.  She still does it, and looks like she is doing a wee Happy Dance when she sees us.  Plus, if we reach down she dances out of the way, like a little fairy!

:roflmao:And we never once had to shout 'DOWN!!!'

 

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Missysmom

love it Jo! i may try that on Missy as she still jumps and of course we let her, heck i'm as excited, maybe even more, to see her! i'm generally on the floor after the first jump anyway! ;) 

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Jo-Anne
On 5-11-2016 at 7:59 PM, Ttouslee said:

Any suggestions on jumping? Bella does pretty good about not jumping on my husband or I when we get home from work, but is terrible when our small grandchildren come in. She loves children SO much and gets so excited, she knocks over our youngest granddaughter often. We are consistent with her and have taught the grandkids to say "down" but no luck so far, anyone have ideas?

How is it going with Bella jumping on to your grandchild to greet her?

 

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Ttouslee

Oh no change.  Poor girl has to go behind the gate, she cries the whole time. I just feel terrible for her, my granddaughter that she knocks down is 18 months old

On 11/6/2016 at 6:44 AM, Pawz4me said:

How old are your grandkids?

Does Bella really, really know "down"? I mean know it as in she'll do it for you almost instantly in all sorts of different settings and situations, including lots of distractions? If you haven't "proofed" her on it like that then I wouldn't be asking little kids to use it. It very well may inadvertently teach her to ignore the command and set her training backwards. One of the golden rules of dog training is that you never, ever ask for a behavior if you're not sure the dog will comply or if you can't enforce it.

Have you tried having them kneel down to greet her?

Sometimes the best choice is to crate the dog when you're expecting company to arrive, let all the humans get over their greetings and give the dog a few minutes to adjust to the newcomers before allowing the dog out to interact.

The above are a lot of "correct" and "supposed to" responses. But IME the fact of the matter is some dogs just get so darn excited it's hard to know what to do. We were gone for a few hours last night and when we got home Yogi (five years old and supposedly long past the puppy stage) got so excited he didn't know what to do with himself for about fifteen minutes. And it was just us, his regular people that he lives with all the time and who come and go all the time.

I like this idea, she does calm down after a while and does much better. And no, in all honesty she doesn't know down that well. I have a lot to learn with small breeds. My golden didn't have these types of issues and just seemed to know what I wanted from her.

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Jo-Anne

How old is Bella now? She is only trying to tell you how much she loves your grandchild :blush: It is a perfectly normal way to greet each other in dog terms (trying to reach the face..to give a nose kiss)..it is love..but I do understand this is not nice for your grandchild..so you as Bella`s Mom can change it. Bella should know..not by word.. what you want Mom.. and how. Training her will be fun and there is  quite an easy way to do that too, but you have to be consequent and patient..we always say babysteps..one dog learns faster then the other..I am sorry but are you talking about that you never had these issues with your golden..you mean a retriever?

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Ttouslee
On November 12, 2016 at 4:55 AM, Jo-Anne said:

How old is Bella now? She is only trying to tell you how much she loves your grandchild :blush: It is a perfectly normal way to greet each other in dog terms (trying to reach the face..to give a nose kiss)..it is love..but I do understand this is not nice for your grandchild..so you as Bella`s Mom can change it. Bella should know..not by word.. what you want Mom.. and how. Training her will be fun and there is  quite an easy way to do that too, but you have to be consequent and patient..we always say babysteps..one dog learns faster then the other..I am sorry but are you talking about that you never had these issues with your golden..you mean a retriever?

Bella will be 9 months old tomorrow. I really do understand that she just loves the kids. She is just trying to show them love I do get that. I appreciate the suggestions given here and will keep working with her as she is still a baby. And yes my last baby was a golden retriever, "Gracie". Lost her at age 10. Loved her to the end, she was such a gentle soul! Bella was my mend for a broken heart. I couldn't imagine loving her more.

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Vespertine
On 06/11/2016 at 10:40 AM, Crinkly said:

The puppy classes we went to with C&T had an absolutely brilliant solution to puppies jumping up.  Works on any size dog, and works really quickly.

Is there any chance this technique could turn them off having their paws touched in other situations by creating a negative association with paw touching?

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Crinkly
5 hours ago, Vespertine said:

Is there any chance this technique could turn them off having their paws touched in other situations by creating a negative association with paw touching?

Well, it didn't happen with Tara, but then I naturally touch Tara's paws Ina variety of circumstances, grooming, tummy rubs, checking them after walks, fur and toe tickling when she is asleep, putting her coat on, drying with towel... she just seems to shrug and put up with them all as 'mum stuff' bless her.

besides, if you are holding on to her paws for too long, or too hard, or causing any thing more than mild 'lemme go please Mum' then you are taking the lesson too far. :)

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Jo-Anne
9 hours ago, Ttouslee said:

 Bella was my mend for a broken heart. I couldn't imagine loving her more.

That happened to me too..my lovely shepard just died and I was very sad. Just like Bella..my Karel was my mend for a broken heart..such sweet words Tammy.

If you want to know.. beside your own training with Bella,  how to train her for instance with harnass and leash..just pm me. 

 

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PipsMom
11 hours ago, Vespertine said:

Is there any chance this technique could turn them off having their paws touched in other situations by creating a negative association with paw touching?

Excessive paw handling, massaging, playing with their feet is actually encouraged so when you cut nails and trim the hair on their feet ......they don't mind it one bit as they are use to the feel of your loving hands.

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Vespertine

I'm trying to touch Effie's feet and other sensitive spots like her ears a lot. She's very relaxed being touched, and I want to keep it that way.

Luckily, it's been raining on and off all week, so I've been drying her little paws off with a towel about ten times a day!

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Pawz4me
16 hours ago, Vespertine said:

Is there any chance this technique could turn them off having their paws touched in other situations by creating a negative association with paw touching?

Yes, I think that is a risk. It's not a technique that I care for at all or recommend, but I do know some people use it with success.

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Ttouslee
16 hours ago, Jo-Anne said:

That happened to me too..my lovely shepard just died and I was very sad. Just like Bella..my Karel was my mend for a broken heart..such sweet words Tammy.

If you want to know.. beside your own training with Bella,  how to train her for instance with harnass and leash..just pm me. 

 

Thank you from the bottom of my heart Jo-Ann. I will take you up on that offer

❤️? 

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